Were the biblical prophets schizophrenic?

If I saw a biblical prophet walking around in my neighborhood today, prophesying in public, I’d probably think he was hallucinating — maybe a guy from one of those halfway houses, schizophrenic or on drugs.  Yet many people seem to literally believe rants like that because they read them in a book that is over 2000 years old.  Some supposedly “educated” people speaking from the pulpit tell us that stuff is true.  Now, I know that some people are possibly able to go into a meditative state and see things that other people can’t see.  The first time I smoked pot (more than 40 years ago and I haven’t done it in 30 years) I saw the people in the paintings laughing at me and the floor was tilting.  It sure looked real, and scared the you-know-what out of me. The problem with taking that 2000 year old book literally is that it has been translated and re-translated.  At different times in history, the interpretations have been controlled and maybe even written by kings and popes whose major purpose was to own and to control.  I’ve been told to have faith.  One definition of “faith” on Dictionary.com is  “strong or unshakeable belief in something, especially without proof or evidence.”  It would be really stupid of me to have faith in what politicians say, in commercials advertising products, and in almost everything I read on the internet or in the newspapers.  Yet I am asked to have faith in that much translated book that is over 2000 years old?  I have more faith in Monty Python’s “Life of Brian” where thousands of people are listening to the sermon on the mount.  The people standing in the back couldn’t hear what he was saying and mis-interpreted most of it.  At least, I got a laugh out of that.

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About feistylynnie

I am a closet explorer of the weird, unusual and extraordinary sides of life, masquerading as a normal person. I play viola and violin in many styles including classical, blues, folk and disco. I am also a horse, donkey, cat and dog lover and total geek.
This entry was posted in belief, bible, contrarian, Monty Python's "Life of Brian", religion, skeptic. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Were the biblical prophets schizophrenic?

  1. Harvey Chaplik says:

    Well, that must have been some seriously good stuff. I also tried the weed ages ago but only once did it work as advertised. But I hated smoking and like to remain in control and the creator of my own mental/emotional phenomena based on personal experiences.
    Insofar as faith goes, the formula is: Belief – Evidence = Superstition. However, there is ample evidence for certain faiths; perhaps they can be called hypotheses. Faith based on spirituality and possibly even religion is not necessarily antithetical to reason. And if faith brings one peace, hope and comfort while not hurting or impinging on anyone else, then what’s the problem? In fact, I am envious of those with such faith who are secure enough in their beliefs that they feel no need to proselytize.

  2. feistylynnie says:

    As I’ve shared that pot story through the years, I’ve been told that the stuff I smoked probably contained another ingredient — perhaps PCP. Maybe someday I’ll share the whole tale which involves a string quartet, Schubert art songs, a naked male cello player, stopping the car in the middle of the road in order to admire the beauty of the stop lights, being high for three days, and my own very young, virginal naivete.

    Re my rant on faith and the bible, it was strongly influenced by the current debate over the rescinding of California’s Proposition 8 and the desire of some religious zealots to immediately impeach the federal judge who made the ruling. Some people are making decisions about that based on that 2000 year old book I spoke of — of course, picking and choosing what tidbits to believe and what to deny. I can’t for the life of me understand why the parts about “loving thy neighbor…” are ignored while the parts about “If a man lies with a man as one lies with a woman… they must be put to death…” are believed literally. Who wrote that statement anyway? Was it a schizophrenic guy from a halfway house? That was my underlying point.

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